Meleana Ē - by Francis Samuel Ka`a`a 

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Meleana ē, Meleana hoʻi
Meleana ka wahine lomilomi ia

Meleana ē, Meleana hoʻi
ʻO ʻoe kai pono o ka ua

Meleana ē, Meleana hoʻi
ʻO ka ipu kukui mālamalama

Meleana ē, Meleana hoʻi
I ka lepo ulaula o Kapahulu

Meleana ē, Meleana hoʻi
ʻO ka otomobile aʻe aukūaukū ʻana

Meleana ē, Meleana hoʻi
E ala mai ʻoe moe loa nei

Haʻina ʻia mai ana ka puana
Meleana ka wahine lomilomi ia


Heed me Maryann, Maryann come
Woman, come and massage me

Listen Maryann, Maryann come
You are so right for me
 
Pay attention Maryann, Maryann come
You are my light
 
Heed me Maryann, Maryann come
The red dirt of Kapahulu

Listen Maryann, Maryann come
The automobile sways back and forth


Hey Maryann, Maryann come
Come and sleep here tonight

Tell the refrain
Maryann, the woman who massages


Source:
Source: Jon Omi Keoni who acquired this information from Maryann's half sister, Francis Ka'a'a Na'ehu, an employee of the Federal Post Office in Honolulu. - This song was written for the composer's daughter, Maryann Ka`a`a Dias, the mother of the former Farrington High School football coach Skippa Dias. Maryann or Meleana used to massage her father's shoulders when she was a young girl. Lomi lomi iʻa means to massage the fish. She was of Hawaiian-Scandinavian extraction and lived at the turn of the century.
Captain Christian L’Orange was sent to Norway by the Hawaiian government and the Sugar Planters to recruit workers for the sugar fields and mills. In 1880, the Norwegian ship Bega left the port of Drammen, Norway, with 400 contract workers, mostly Norwegians with some Swedes and Danes. The first of the workers arrived February 18, 1881, and anchored off Maui, after a brutal 6-month voyage. The 2nd ship, Musca, left Norway in May, with 230 immigrants contracted for sugar plantations on Maui and the Big Island. Culture and climate shock, harsh living and working conditions and controversy caused much discontent. When word reached Norway, Hawaiʻi was not able to enlist more workers from Scandinavia and started to import labor from Asia. Only about 100 of the original 630 workers remained in Hawaiʻi. Bautastein was erected on Mâʻalaea, Maui, near the McGregor Point lighthouse, to commerorate the arrival of the 630 Scandinavian contract workers. Bautastein is a Viking tradition where a stone marker is placed at the spot of first landing in a foreign land. Translated by Kanani Mana Copyright 1963 Miller Music Corp Music clip by Me Ke Aloha Serenaders